FAB BAG Magazine
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Published on July 31st, 2015 | by Jehan Raffiuddin

BEAUTY SCIENCE: Free skin with AHAs

You may have heard of AHAs in skin products, fruits and wine – but what are they and how do they work in regards to skin?

AHAs or alphahydroxy acids are one of the most common ingredients of skin ‘peels’ – they are basically an exfoliating agent but without the abrasive textures of common scrubs and exfoliants. You may not feel any ‘grittiness’ while applying a product with AHAs but you’ll still get softer, smoother skin as an end result.

The science:

AHAs penetrate through the dead surface of the skin, loosening the bonds that keep them attached to the deeper surface. The loose cells then slough off exposing the younger, fresher and smoother skin below.

Raid your fridge

Cleopatra bathed in ass’s milk for a reason… Many of the ‘acids’ found in food items are AHAs and while their application won’t give you a chemical-peel effect because the concentration of the acid is lower, it will certainly give you a glow! Here’s a list:

  1. Lactic acid: in milk, yoghurt, buttermilk, tomatoes, powdered skim milk
  2. Glycolic acid: in sweet fruits and sugarcane juice
  3. Citric acid: in found in citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons
  4. Malic acid: in apples, cider, vinegar
  5. Tartaric acid: in wines, grapes, grape juice

To use: There are two ways to go about it – solid and liquid. Solid chunks of fruit can be cut-up, mashed a little in your hand to get the juices flowing and then simply rubbed onto the skin – you don’t have to limit yourself to just your face – go ahead and give yourself a fruity rub all over; wait for 10 minutes before washing off. If it’s just your face and neck you want the glow to be on, use a teaspoon of liquid: wine, milk, vinegar, juice or even fruit puree. Dip a cotton ball into the liquid and swab the liquid generously across the face, neck and décolleté. Avoid the sensitive eye area. Wait for 10 minutes and wash off for a youthful skin.

Use it right:

While using products with AHAs do remember certain ground rules…

1. Generally as with all, chemical skin treatments, do consult a dermatologist before experimenting.
2. AHA-treated skin is photosensitive so always remember your SPF when you step out. Also do try and avoid strong sun exposure for a day or two!
3. People with sensitive skin may experience redness, extra tingling and even a slight roughness to the skin – do desist if your skin reacts.
4. Since younger layers of skin come to the fore after an AHA treatment, do remember to hydrate it well with a good moisturiser.

FAB BAG Picks:

Here’s a smattering of products for you to try that contain AHAs:

1. Clarins White Plus Whitening Velvet Emulsion: The Clarins White Plus Whitening Velvet Emulsion does indeed moisturise skin and brighten the complexion – the product lasts and so do the results. A weightless, oil-free whitening emulsion that is enriched with Sea Lily, extracts of Alchemilla & Raspberry to regulate synthesis of melanin pigments, it visibly improves appearance of hyperpigmentation & discolorations. CLICK HERE to view product.

2. Iraya Reviving Face Tonic with Pomegranate and Mint: Iraya Reviving Face Tonic with Pomegranate & Mint is a balancing toner made with pomegranate, a powerful antioxidant that helps cell regeneration and preserves skin elasticity. Also contains Manjishta and the essential oil of Mint that rejuvenates and revives, keeping skin healthy and younger looking. CLICK HERE to view product.

3. The Nature’s Co. Lemon Peel Exfoliating Body Wash: It gently exfoliates and makes skin clean & fresh. This clean fresh extract of Lemon Peel not only is a great astringent that helps firm skins elasticity but also balances the pH of the skin which increases the luster of dull and tired looking skin by lightening it mildly. CLICK HERE to view product.

 

 

 

 

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Dances like there's a full house cheering. Dresses like it's the runway. Travels like a nomad and lives each day like it's her last. Chief trouble-maker on any social media platform you can name. High on life since 1991.



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