FAB BAG Magazine
Skincare

Published on February 21st, 2016 | by Yashodhara Ghosh

Brush Away Dead Skin

We’re all fans of gorgeous, glowing, healthy skin. We also know that it takes work and with the number of toxins our bodies are exposed to every day, we need to give them the old brush-off. Dry skin brushing is one of the easiest and arguably reliable ways to get rid of dead cells and boost circulation. If stories are to be believed, dry skin brushing has its roots in Ayurveda as a cleansing system. However, as legendary as its powers might be, as with all beauty treatments, there are dos and donts.

Brush up on it

Your body breathes and absorbs essential nutrients through your skin, regular dry brushing will leave your skin clear of excess debris so it’s free to absorb oxygen and other nutrients into your body. For this, you need to use the right kind of brush. The bristles should be natural, not synthetic, and preferably vegetable-derived. Ensure, the bristles themselves are somewhat stiff, though not too hard or they’ll leave bruises. Look for one that has an attachable handle for hard-to-reach spots, if necessary. Vega’s Cellulite Bristle Bath Brush is a good buy. If you haven’t done skin brushing before, it is wise to start with only one pass over the skin’s surface. Over time you can gradually increase the number of strokes done during each skin brushing session.

How-tos

Dry skin brushing is believed to stimulate the lymphatic system by aiding the flow of lymph fluid throughout the body. The lymphatic system plays a vital role in elimination, helping to move toxins through the body. There are many lymph nodes situated at different places in the body but the inner thighs and armpits hold the greatest number, so it can be helpful to pay extra attention to these areas when brushing. The lymph system flows towards the heart so it’s important to brush in the same flow as the lymphatic system. Make sure the room is warm. Find somewhere comfortable to sit so that you can easily reach your feet and lower legs. Make long sweeps, avoid back and forth, scrubbing and circular motions. Start at your feet, moving up the legs on both sides, then work from the arms toward your chest. On your stomach, direct the brush counterclockwise. Remember, don’t brush too hard: Skin should be stimulated and invigorated, but not irritated. Brush for about three-to-five minutes until your skin is rosy and slightly tingly. Always shower after you dry brush to wash off the dead skin. Never use body brushes on broken or sensitive skin and take care to brush lightly over cellulite areas. After brushing and a shower, you can apply moisturiser or oil.

Dry up

Lovers of dry skin brushing claim this does everything from removing dead layers of skin to strengthening your immune system to improving skin texture and even helping to prevent premature ageing. However, according to recent reports, it’s kind of a tall order to believe that they reduce cellulite and will get you into that cocktail dress you’ve been struggling to zip up. Contrary to popular belief, the liver, not the skin, is the body’s largest eliminator of waste, so rumours that dry skin brushing might eliminate up to a pound of toxins might be slightly exaggerated. But, hey, it’s said to make you feel great and give you a glow. So go ahead and keep brushing.

FAB BAG PICKS

Naked Forest Blend Bath/Body Salt Scrub: Gently Scrub into wet skin. Rinse and pat dry. Leave the excess oils to soak into your skin, taking in their holistic effects. CLICK HERE to view product.

Thalgo Indoceane Sweet And Savoury Body Scrub: A delicious combination of Sea Salt, Cassonade Sugar and plant Essential Oils, this scrub has a unique bi-phase texture to help eliminate rough patches, smooth the skin and leave it feeling beautifully soft. CLICK HERE to view product.

The Body Shop Moringa Body Scrub: A gentle exfoliating scrub for radiant looking skin subtly scented with a delicate, floral fragrance. Stimulates the skin and removes dead skin cells when massaged into the skin. CLICK HERE to view product

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